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Bravery – the uncomfortable strength

In 2004, Christopher Peterson and Martin Seligman published the landmark “Character Strengths and Virtues, A Handbook and Classification”. The manual – also lovingly referred to by the authors as the “Manual of the Sanities” – identifies twenty-four universal strengths and six virtues. By universal, we mean that they these strengths apply regardless of our cultural,

Positive Psychology: So Much More Than Choosing Glasses with a Rosy Hue!

Photo by Steinar Engeland on Unsplash As I read more about positive psychology in the media, I fear that we are becoming increasingly detached from the true messages of the science. As the themes and practices are distilled into articles proposing “The Five Steps to Happiness” or “The Seven Keys to Success,” the subtlety, sophistication, and value of

When Too Much Good is Bad: Wisdom on Using (Not Overusing) Positive Psychology in the Workplace

Photo by Matt Jones on Unsplash As a team leader and coach, I leverage many of the tenets of positive psychology with teams and groups. But these ideas are not magic bullets. There are mess and challenge, confrontation and frustration. The temptation to overuse a tool or technique that appears to work is understandable, particularly

When Strengths Collide

I love to attend conferences. The wealth of knowledge all collected in one place, the people – experts, converts, neophytes, practitioners, researchers, teachers, all gathered for one shared purpose, is energizing – and exhausting. I have learned a lot from the various conferences I have attended in the last few years. I have built great

Sustainable Growth: Is Change Closer Than You Think?

Photo by Omar Lopez on Unsplash A Change in Perspective Recently, three teenagers told me that they were truly changed people. Not because of anything bad, and not just because they’re growing up, but because positive psychology and the tools it offers had equipped them to better handle everyday life. They described feeling empowered and more hopeful. They